Mommy Blog Expert: Parents Intro to Buying Kids Videogames & Consoles - Finding Best Options for Your Child

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Parents Intro to Buying Kids Videogames & Consoles - Finding Best Options for Your Child


Video Games
A Guide for Parents



by Benny Balazs
Lifestyle Writer

1st in a multi-part series

Boy test drives game consoles, Janis Brett Elspas, MommyBlogExpert.com 
For you parents out there wondering about getting your kids into the world of video games, and are unsure of how to begin, this post could be quite helpful. I have been an avid gamer for most of my life, and through my personal experiences growing up, I've learned just about everything that’s needed for a kid to have a fun and healthy lifestyle with games.

Are video games worth investing in? 

There’s no way around it. Videogames cost money and every year they cost more and more. You would have to put down at least $500 for the newest in gaming tech, such as the XBox ONE or PlayStation 4, and individual games average around $60 at release. So, if dishing out that much cash isn’t an issue, then you can go full throttle and buy your child the top notch stuff.

XBox ONE, Janis Brett Elspas, MommyBlogExpert.com
If you are on a budget, though, and your gamer is just starting out, I'd suggest getting some older generation hardware. Your kid doesn’t need the newest games to have fun and be entertained. If your child is young, and still new to videogames, I would suggest a handheld console such as the Nintendo 3DS. This is a fun, simple, and overall child-friendly gaming device that satisfies most kids’ needs for entertainment. But the best part is it's mobile, making this portable device perfect for long plane rides or road trips and keeping children busy while traveling for hours.

The best model of the 3DS, the 3DS XL, goes for $199 retail, but if you want an even better deal, you can always opt for the 2DS instead. The 2DS is a budget version of the 3DS that is designed for kids. It is extremely durable, built to sustain damage, and unlike its brother models, is built as one piece, without a foldable top portion that could get snapped off if your youngster is too rough. This way your kid can rough-house the device, and it’ll hold up pretty well, for the discounted price of $130 retail. 


Infinity is popular with Kids, Janis Brett Elspas, MommyBlogExpert.com
Want to save even more money with older generations of gaming equipment and game purchases? Then you might want to check resources such as eBay and Craigs List where you'll find prices that are way below retail. Also worth investigating: major store chains like GameStop that buy, trade and sell refurbished gaming equipment and also offer a huge selection of previously owned, gently used video games.


My son the gamer, Janis Brett Elspas, MommyBlogExpert.com
Stay Tuned!
Future posts is this series will cover everything you want to know about videogames for your children. Upcoming topics include an explanation of the ESRB rating system, a shopping guide to headphones, cables and other gaming accessories, as well as a discussion of how young is too young for your child to start playing with video games, and more.

About the Author
Californian Benny Balazs comes from a Hungarian family on both sides and describes himself as a writer by day and a singer by night. A newly-minted graduate, he received his high school's top music award, was a member of an a cappella group, editor in chief of a student literary magazine and originated/wrote a newspaper column as well a school play.  Following his passion for performing and literary arts, he hopes to join an a cappella group soon and aspires to write a book.

Please Leave a Comment And Share
What questions and concerns do you have about buying your child their first video games and equipment? Do you have any advice you'd like to add? MBE and our readers, many who are parents, would love to read about your thoughts on this important discussion.

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